Jourdon anderson letter. Moving letter from freed slave Jourdon Anderson to old master after he was asked back to work on his farm 2019-02-01

Jourdon anderson letter Rating: 5,2/10 861 reviews

Was Never Any Pay

jourdon anderson letter

At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. He laments his being shot at by Col. According to other published and online records of his family tree, P. From your old servant, Jourdon Anderson. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson.

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Jordan Anderson

jourdon anderson letter

Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865 To My Old Master, Colonel P. Jr, the Henry mentioned in the letter, appears in censii in Wilson County as late as 1880. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again. Anderson, Jourdan's former master back in Big Spring, Tennessee. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living.

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Jourdon Anderson's Letter to His Old Master

jourdon anderson letter

This in no way takes away from the power of the letter, which strongly hits home very real experiences that were widespread. Again, I'd be interested to see the first letter, presumably sent by Col. Notably, seven of the slaves, all of them minors, were listed as mulatto, however the distribution of ages of slaves in particular the lack of female slaves of the correct age to be mothers suggest that many of the younger slaves came from different owners originally. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance. Whether this help entailed simply transcribing Anderson's reply or whether this person assisted in reworking the letter possibly with Anderson's knowledge is unclear. In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls.

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Moving letter from freed slave Jourdon Anderson to old master after he was asked back to work on his farm

jourdon anderson letter

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Before the war he owned two slaves, and each was mulatto. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. I would rather stay here and starve — and die, if it come to that — than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me. Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me. I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me.

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Was Never Any Pay

jourdon anderson letter

Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past we can have little faith in your promises in the future. Now, if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again. He told his story to his friend and gave all the reasons why he would not return, and his friend wrote it out in letter form. Apparently the comedian Jonathan Winters is a descendent of Mr. Here are three of the most interesting messages: Jourdon Anderson Wikimedia Commons A drawing of Jourdon Anderson next to a clip of one of the many newspapers in which his letter was published. Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

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Moving letter from freed slave Jourdon Anderson to old master after he was asked back to work on his farm

jourdon anderson letter

Upon encountering Jordan, the soldiers granted him, his wife and children their freedom, making the act official with papers from the Provost Marshal General of Nashville, documents Jordan would treasure for the rest of his life. They go to Sunday- School, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. He cannot read or write, and Amanda can only read, but all of his children attend school in the records shown. As genealogists will know, slave schedules did not include the names of the slaves, just their age, sex, and whether they were black or mulatto of mixed ancestry. As a comparison, the smoothness of the narrative of comes to mind.

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Freed Slave Writes Letter to Former Master: You Owe Us $11,680 for 52 Years of Unpaid Labor (1865)

jourdon anderson letter

As it turns out, following the Civil War, the Anderson Plantation had fallen into complete disrepair, as is wont to happen when your entire workforce leaves pretty much all at once. . No matter how long I live, the dehumanizing insanity of racism will never fail to astonish and amaze me. Reconstruction did open the door for political involvement on the part of former slaves. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Unsurprisingly, Henry never took Jordan up on his offer to pay him 50 years of wages in one go and the letter likely stopped any of his other slaves being tempted back when he wrote to them as well. From your old servant, Jourdon Anderson Quote: The letter was reprinted by Lydia Maria Child in her anthology, The Freedmen's Book.

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Letter from Jourdon Anderson: A Freedman Writes His Former Master

jourdon anderson letter

It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. In the summer of 1865, a former slave by the name of Jourdan Anderson sent a letter to his former master. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I am doing tolerably well here. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this for harboring Rebs they found at your house.

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Letter from Jourdon Anderson: A Freedman Writes His Former Master

jourdon anderson letter

Keep in mind that Mr. I don't have access to The Cincinnati Commercial before 1867. Anderson, in response to the Colonel's request that Mr. Notably, seven of the slaves, all of them minors, were listed as mulatto, however the distribution of ages of slaves in particular the lack of female slaves of the correct age to be mothers suggest that many of the younger slaves came from different owners originally. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. One such example of this bewildering logic comes from a , pictured above: a man enslaved to one Colonel Patrick Henry Anderson in Big Spring, Tennessee.

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A Free Man's Letter to A Former Slaveowner in 1865

jourdon anderson letter

The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. Many darkies would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. And who could blame them; they were constantly beat, threatened, and even killed. Turns out, it was much harder to keep a business running when you had to pay your workers. He addressed Major Anderson from Ohio, where he had secured good wages for himself and schooling for his children.

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