A vindication of the rights of women text. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman 2019-02-25

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Citation Tool: Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Routledge Guides to Literature. Craciun, Adriana (Routledge, 2013)

a vindication of the rights of women text

Yet, if they only wished to lengthen out their sway, they should not entirely trust to their persons, for though beauty may gain a heart, it cannot keep it, even while the beauty is in full bloom, unless the mind lend, at least, some graces. Besides, there are many husbands so devoid of sense and parental affection that, during the first effervescence of voluptuous fondness, they refuse to let their wives suckle their children. Where are they to be found? Our trees are now allowed to spread with wild luxuriance, nor do we expect by force to combine the majestic marks of time with youthful graces; but wait patiently till they have struck deep their root, and braved many a storm. Both Wollstonecraft and Burke associate him with thinking, particularly the notion that civilization could progress through rational debate, but they interpret that stance differently. The savage hand of rapine is unnerved by this chivalrous spirit; and, if the stroke of vengeance cannot be stayed--the lady is entreated to pardon the rudeness and depart in peace, though sprinkled, perhaps, with her husband's or brother's blood. But this, and any similar maxim deduced from simple reason, raises an outcry—the church or the state is in danger, if faith in the wisdom of antiquity is not implicit; and they who, roused by the sight of human calamity, dare to attack human authority, are reviled as despisers of God, and enemies of man. These two women may be much upon a par with respect to reason and humanity, and, changing situations, might have acted just the same selfish part ; but had they been differently educated, the case would also have been very different.

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Which evaluation of A Vindication of the Rights of Woman makes an accurate conclusion about

a vindication of the rights of women text

Could the helpless creature whom he called from nothing break loose from his providence, and boldly learn to know good by practising evil, without his permission? The indolent puppet of a court first becomes a luxurious monster, or fastidious sensualist, and then makes the contagion which his unnatural state spread, the instrument of tyranny. When do they, with their superior powers and advantages, turn from the person to the mind? Is one half of the human species, like the poor African slaves, to be subject to prejudices that brutalize them, when principles would be a surer guard only to sweeten the cup of man? Will it be allowed that the surest way to make a wife chaste, is to teach her to practise the wanton arts of a mistress, termed virtuous coquetry by the sensualist who can no longer relish the artless charms of sincerity, or taste the pleasure arising from a tender intimacy, when confidence is unchecked by suspicion, and rendered interesting by sense? To seek for a secret that would render it constant, would be as wild a search as for the philosopher's stone, or the grand panacea ; and the discovery would be equally useless, or rather perni- cious, to mankind. Reason in women is a practical reason, capacitating them artfully to discover the means of attaining a known end, but which would never enable them to discover that end itself. So far from being ashamed of their weakness, they glory in it ; their tender muscles make no resistance ; they affect to be incapable of lifting the smallest burdens, and would blush to be thought robust and strong. She is left a widow, perhaps, without a sufficient provision ; but she is not desolate! For where art thou to find comfort, forlorn and disconsolate one? New York: Free Press 2007 , 295. From her position as a middle-class writer arguing for a middle-class ethos, Wollstonecraft also attacks the wealthy, criticizing them using the same arguments she employs against women. It does not frequently even deserve the name of error ; for many innocent girls become the dupes of a sincere, affectionate heart, and still more are, as it may emphatically be termed, ruined before they know the difference between virtue and vice, and thus prepared by their education for infamy, they become infamous.

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Wollstonecraft, Mary. 1792. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

a vindication of the rights of women text

Refined seventy times seven they are still mate- rial ; intellect dwells not there; nor will fire ever make lead cold! The appetites would answer every earthly purpose, and produce more moderate and permanent happiness. And that tribes of men, like flocks of sheep, should quietly follow such a leader, is a solecism that only a desire of present enjoyment and narrowness of understanding can solve. The paternal home is better for the education of women; they have less need to learn to deal with the interests of others, than to accustom themselves to a calm and secluded life. The very reverse may be said of love. To such lengths, indeed, does an intemperate love of pleasure carry some prudent men, or worn-out libertines, who marry to have a safe bedfellow, that they seduce their own wives. Are they to be considered as vicegerents allowed to reign over a small domain, and answerable for their conduct to a higher tribunal, liable to error? However, Wollstonecraft's arguments for equality stand in contrast to her statements respecting the superiority of masculine strength and valour.

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Citation Tool: Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Routledge Guides to Literature. Craciun, Adriana (Routledge, 2013)

a vindication of the rights of women text

So few that the exceptions remind me of an ingenious con- jecture respecting Newton that he was probably a being of superior order accidentally caged in a human body. When the violence actually escalated in France in 1793 with the , Burke was viewed as a prophet. At one point, she reasons that a woman can become either a slave or tyrant, which she describes as two sides of the same coin. Title page from the first American edition of Rights of Woman A Vindication of the Rights of Woman: with Strictures on Political and Moral Subjects 1792 , written by the 18th-century British , is one of the earliest works of. Into this error men have, probably, been led by viewing education in a false light ; not considering it as the first step to form a being advancing gradually towards perfec- tion ; f but only as a preparation for life.


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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman Quotes by Mary Wollstonecraft

a vindication of the rights of women text

Yeah, this should be simple, but Wollstonecraft was pitting herself against super closed-minded thinkers who were under the impression that women and men were almost two different animals. Going back to first principles, vice skulks, with all its native deformity, from close investigation; but a set of shallow reasoners are always exclaiming that these arguments prove too much, and that a measure rotten at the core may be expedient. All that life can give-- thou givest! In the 18th century, it was often assumed by both educational philosophers and writers, who wrote what one might think of as early self-help books, that women were incapable of rational or abstract thought. Granted ; yet, perhaps, no aphorism ever contained a more paradoxical assertion. This is not the language of the heart, nor will it ever reach it, though the ear may be tickled.

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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman Quotes by Mary Wollstonecraft

a vindication of the rights of women text

But these wise designs of nature are counteracted by mistaken fondness or blind zeal. Journal of the History of Ideas 39 1978 : 293—302. What else was Wollstonecraft talking about way back in 1792? Indeed, the husband may not have any religion to teach her, though in such a situation she will be in great want of a support to her virtue, independent of worldly considerations. When I first thought of writing these strictures I anticipated Mrs. I shall begin with Rousseau, and give a sketch of his character of woman in his own words, interspersing com- ments and reflections. An imagination of this vigorous cast can give existence to insubstantial forms, and stability to the shadowy reveries which the mind naturally falls into when realities are found vapid. The regulation of the behaviour is not modesty, though those who study rules of decorum, are, in general termed modest women.

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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman Quotes by Mary Wollstonecraft

a vindication of the rights of women text

Friendship or indifference inevitably succeeds love. A Different Face: The Life of Mary Wollstonecraft. Man has been held out as independent of His power who made him, or as a lawless planet darting from its orbit to steal the celestial fire of reason ; and the vengeance of Heaven, lurking in the subtile flame, like Pandora's pent-up mischiefs, sufficiently punished his temerity, by introducing evil into the world. They want a lover and protector: and behold him kneeling before them--bravery prostrate to beauty! But what have women to do in society? Capital-R Reason that you should care 4: Hey, how about women having careers? The pernicious tendency of those books, in which the writers insidiously degrade the sex whilst they are prostrate before their personal charms, cannot be too often or too severely exposed. If women be ever allowed to walk without leading-strings, why must they be cajoled into virtue by artful flattery and sexual compliments? It is also worth while to note her excellent hints on the subject of education.

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Wollstonecraft, Mary. 1792. A Vindication of the Rights of Woman

a vindication of the rights of women text

Perhaps it is necessary for virtue first to appear in a human form to impress youthful hearts; the ideal model, which a more matured and exalted mind looks up to, and shapes for itself, would elude their sight. These are excellent reasons for the steps she took. Boston: Little, Brown and Co. Devotion, or love, may be allowed to hallow the garments as well as the person; for the lover must want fancy, who has not a sort of sacred respect for the glove or slipper of his mistress. Wollstonecraft sent a copy of the book to the historian , whom she greatly admired. This awesome lady, by the way, also wrote A Vindication of the Rights of Men.

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