1920s slang terms. 1920's Slang Dictionary : 1930's Prohibition Terms : keplarllp.com 2019-01-28

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The Internet Guide to Jazz Age Slang

1920s slang terms

To know one's beeswax; to know what someone's talking about. She reports emotionally to evoke a reaction from her audience. Are we noticing a trend here? Berkeley, California: University of California Press. Cheaters: Glasses or bifocals 15. Houdini- To be on time for a date. Fire Extinguisher: the escort or chaperone for a social event. Seetie- Anybody a flapper hates.

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1920's Slang Dictionary

1920s slang terms

The slang also reflects changing morals and ideas, especially surrounding sexuality. In honor of this exhibition, I've scoured the Internet for a list of and phrases that we need to add to our contemporary conversations. Ducky- General term for approbation. Bun Duster- See Cake Eater Bush Hounds- Rustics and others outside of the Flapper pale. The reference is to A.

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English Slang Terms and Phrases of the 1920s

1920s slang terms

Static- Conversation that means nothing. I've heard it so many times in period movies. Also, the words that emerged in a particular year are noted appropriately. Given the Air- When a girl or fellow is thrown down on a date. The current first use comes from 1923, thus predating hot diggety 1924 but coming after the exclamation hot dog 1906. Both are without doubt wrong. Lens Louise: the person who steamrolls the conversation.


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1920's Slang Dictionary

1920s slang terms

Flat Tire: A dull-witted or disappointing date. A woman might get dolled up in her glad rags for a late night on the town, meaning that she put some care into her appearance and wore her nicest garments. Face Stretcher: an older lady still trying to look young and usually failing. Streeted: to be tossed out of a party. Many of these terms suggest a sense of fun and mischievousness, both of which ran rampant during the 1920s. Vocal appear in speech before they appear in print.

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1920's Slang Dictionary : 1930's Prohibition Terms : keplarllp.com

1920s slang terms

Number first: The Roaring Twenties really did have the coolest vernacular ever. Flappers, young women who enjoyed risque garments and late night dancing, abounded, as did daddys, wealthy older men, to support them. Ground Grippers: shoes or sneakers. . The same book provides the earliest instance of skint as a colloquial synonym for penniless. Flapper: A stylish, brash young woman with short skirts and shorter hair.

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1920's Slang and Definitions

1920s slang terms

An alternative, mezzo-brow, dates to 1925 as both noun and adjective but has proved to have made rather less of a lasting impression. Archived from on 22 October 2007. Go say that to someone who'll believe your phonus balonus. Dog Kennels- Pair of shoes. These are the most common words and phrases of the time, many of which you may be surprised to note are still very much in use today! The reader will find more Jazz Age slang, along with literally hundreds of other words and selected etymologies.

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59 Quick Slang Phrases From The 1920s We Should Start Using Again

1920s slang terms

A frequently derogatory term, particularly in the heated cultural wars of the 1920s, 1924 as a noun; 1928 as an adjective evolved as a way of filling the gap between lowbrow a person who is not highly intellectual or cultured, dating to 1901 for the noun and 1907 for the adjective and highbrow at the other end of the spectrum; 1908 noun, 1884 adjective. Using it to describe sex appeal is currently dated to the first years of the twentieth century, and Glyn popularized the term. Some seem apt for the era, some might surprise, and all twenty selected below have survived for almost a century. Oliver Twist: an extremely good dancer. Others have faded into obscurity, only to be revived in films and books which celebrate the 1920s. Used in both humorous and serious situations.

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59 Quick Slang Phrases From The 1920s We Should Start Using Again

1920s slang terms

Another term for a yeti, was apparently originally a mistranslation of an alleged Tibetan name for the beast: metoh kangmi. Being a good hoofer, a dancer, was also a valued trait. Urban Set- Her new gown. Flour Lover- Girl who powders too freely. Blind Pig: a speakeasy or other establishment where illicit alcohol was served. Same as spifflicated, tanked or zozzled Corn: Bourbon as in liquor made from corn Crab: Try to work out a puzzling situation Crasher: An uninvited guest at a party or event Crate: Car that is not stylish Croak: To die Croaker: Doctor or surgeon Crush: An infatuation. Kick the Gong Around: to smoke opium.

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